Observational Life Drawing

Week 2:

Drawing from the core 2
Drawing from the core 2

Drawing from the core
Drawing from the core

This session was all about the mainstay of good observational life drawing – how to measure.

Daunting for some, hated by others and loved by the few. Whichever way you look at it it’s the only way you can check to see if proportions and angles are correct. The eyes do funny things with how we see, so it’s good to know you have these basic techniques to back you up when things look like they’re all going wrong.
3 ways to help you measure – all of which feel awkward at first, but after practice they become part of your drawing practice and become so fluid you’re barely aware you’re doing them – promise!!

Working from the core – checking proportions and ratios – angles

Guidelines 2
Guidelines 2
Guidelines1
Guidelines1

Along with being aware of the perpendicular central line of the model, everything else rests on using guidelines to help you ‘see’ what’s happening on the model and what you’re representing on the page. Guidelines is probably the most important word I tell students when teaching life drawing – so I look forward to see a lot more of them before this course is over.

My view is that even when doing observational life drawing there is room for fluid creative gestural and intuitive drawing – the measuring is there to support your creativity – not hinder it. Students need to remember that it’s a learning curve – and with life drawing being the discipline of all disciplines in the art world – it takes time, and dedication.

I just hope you all get the same buzz I get. The buzz comes from intense concentration and involvement in your subject matter. Here are just a few examples of student drawings.